Summer Hacks: Getting That Pesky Chlorine Smell Out Of Your Bathing Suit



Summer is a fun time of year. Cook-outs, fairs, festivals, fun in the sun, and plenty of swimming to beat the heat. Cooling off in a pool is a common choice for many people during the summer months.

Maybe you go to a public pool, a water park, a personal pool, or you’re upgrading your older home‌ with a new pool!

It doesn’t matter where you’re spending your cool off time, all pools have something in common — they need to stay clean. Almost all swimming pools‌ need chemicals added to the water in order to stay clean and not breed bacteria.

The main chemical used in pools is chlorine. Chlorine in pools can wreak havoc on more than just your skin and hair; it can also damage your swimsuit.

All you want to do is relax, unplug from the world, and enjoy your time by the water, not worry about your favorite bathing suit‌ getting ruined. It’s extra stress during what should be a relaxing time.

Even if you’re not someone who spends an arm and a leg on swimwear, it’s still disappointing to buy a new bathing suit‌ you love only to notice it getting ruined before you even got the chance to enjoy it.

Effects of Chlorine

Chlorine sitting in your swimwear for extended periods of time without being washed out can cause more damage than you might think. If you’re noticing your suits barely last one summer season, chlorine may be the culprit.

Chlorine can cause stretching of material, fading of colors, and overall deterioration of your bathing suit’s fabric.

White swimsuits are especially susceptible to chlorine’s effects. If you do not clean a white suit properly, you will notice it begin to turn a yellowish color before long.

Making sure you correctly get the chlorine out of your suit will extend its life and keep it looking fresh for you, summer after summer. So how do you go about getting that pesky chemical out?

Here are some few methods and options you can use.

Rinse Immediately

Sometimes, you can tackle the problem before it even becomes one. Rinsing your suit as soon as you exit chlorine-filled water can help prevent your suit from retaining the odor and chemicals.

You can rinse your suit by either taking a cool shower while wearing your suit, or you can simply remove the suit and rinse in cool water. Either way, make sure you rinse the suit thoroughly.

Doing so will ensure you are getting as much chlorine out as possible.

Along with rinsing after, you can also rinse your suit before you enter chlorine filled water. This will not prevent your suit from absorbing any chlorine, but it can help with not allowing it to absorb as much.

If you’re able, simply hop in the shower before taking a dip in the pool, and allow your suit to soak up some clean water.

Wash Your Suit

Maybe you rinsed your suit and the smell still remains, or maybe you want something a little stronger to make sure that chlorine isn’t lingering. Washing your suit could be the next step.

But there is a method to this process. Washing your swimsuit along with your other clothing items runs the risk of ruining your suit.

You’ve probably hand-washed your clothing, but you can also hand-wash your swimsuit to be sure your washer is not too harsh. You don’t have to take this extra step if you’re comfortable with your washer's gentle setting.

Add a very mild soap to either the water you are hand-washing in or your washing machine. When finished washing, be sure to let your suit air dry either indoors or outside out of direct sunlight.


Never put your suit in the dryer as this could ruin the material and cause it to stretch out.

Chlorine Remover

If you don’t think washing will be enough, or you did wash and the smell still remains, chlorine remover may be something to try.

The price won’t break your bank and it can typically be found at a variety of pharmacy stores or superstores and even online retailers.

If all else fails and you are unable to find it at a regular retailer, you can always make your way to a pet store where they are guaranteed to have it in stock.

Just look in the fish aisle, and plenty of bottles should be available.

To use, add a few drops of the remover to a tub or bucket full of cold water. Submerge the suit and swish it around a few times before leaving it to soak in the solution for a few minutes.

After soaking, gently wring the excess water out of the suit and allow it to air dry.

Baking Soda and Vinegar

Baking soda and vinegar is a natural option to remove chlorine from your suit. You can wash your swimsuit in your washing machine with a mixture of baking soda and vinegar as an alternative to detergent.

Add a half cup of vinegar and baking soda to a gentle cycle on your washer, throw in your suit, and let it work its magic. Just make sure to allow your suit to air dry after washing.

Vinegar

You probably have vinegar handy in your home for a variety of reasons. You can also use it by itself to remove chlorine from your swimwear.

Fill a bucket with equal parts water and vinegar and submerge your suit completely in the mixture. Allow it to soak for two hours or so, before removing and rinsing with cool, clean water.

After rinsing your suit, gently wring out excess water and allow the suit to air dry.

Vodka

You may enjoy alcoholic drinks while spending time at the pool, but save some of your vodka for after you’ve finished relaxing.

Vodka makes a wonderful cleaner and can be very effective at removing the chlorine chemicals from your bathing suit.

To use, simply fill a small spray bottle with vodka and spray all over your suit. Then allow the suit to dry either inside or outside away from direct sunlight.

Enjoy Your Summer, Without the Worry

Summer is a time for fun. If your fun includes cooling off in a pool containing chlorine, try to worry less about ruining your swimsuit.

Just pick any of these tips to use to get your suit fresh and clean, and get back to enjoying your summer vacation!

Alexandra Arcand
Alexandra Arcand, USInsuranceAgents.com

Alexandra Arcand writes for USInsuranceAgents.com and is an avid lover of summertime and cooling off in a swimming pool.
 




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